Project lifetime perspectives August 3, 2021 Author: Oren Eini, CEO RavenDB
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I’m teaching a course in university, which gives me some interesting perspective into the mind of new people who join our profession.

One of the biggest differences that I noticed was with the approach to software architecture and maintenance concerns.  Frankly, some of the the exercises that I had to review made my eyes bleed a little (the students got full marks, because the point was getting things done, not code quality). I talked with the students about the topic and I realized that I have a very different perspective on software development and architecture than they have.

The codebase that I work with the most is RavenDB, I have been working on the project for the past 12 years, with some pieces of code going back closer to two decades. In contrast, my rule for giving tasks for students is that I can complete the task in under two hours from an empty slate.

Part and parcel of the way that I’m thinking about software is the realization that any piece of code that I’ll write is going to be maintained for a long period of time. A student writing code for a course doesn’t have that approach, in fact, it is rare that they use the same code across semesters. That lead to seeing a lot of practices as unnecessary or superfluous. Even some of the things that I consider as the very basic (source control, tests, build scripts) are things that the students didn’t even encounter up to this point (years 2 and 3 for most of the people I interact with) and they may very well get a degree with no real exposure for those concerns.

Most tasks in university are well scoped, clear and they are known to be feasible within the given time frame. Most of the tasks outside of university are anything but.

That got me thinking about how you can get a student to realize the value inherent in industry best practices, and the only real way to do that is to immerse them in a big project, something that has been around for at least 3 – 5 years. Ideally, you could have some project that the students will do throughout the degree, but that requires a massive amount of coordination upfront. It is likely not feasible outside of specific fields. If you are learning to be a programmer in the gaming industry, maybe you can do something like produce a game throughout the degree, but my guess is that this is still not possible.

A better alternative would be to give students the chance to work with a large project, maybe even contributing code to it. The problem there is that having a whole class start randomly sending pull requests to a project is likely to cause some heartburn to the maintenance staff.

What was your experience when moving from single use, transient projects to projects that are expected to run for decades? Not as a single running instance, just a project that is going to be kept alive for a long while…

Woah, already finished? 🤯

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